Discussion:
Lincoln Log Sandwich
(too old to reply)
Anny Middon
2007-05-23 20:12:47 UTC
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The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.

Here's what Williams responded:

"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."

Anny
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-23 20:46:00 UTC
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Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."
Anny
Williams is a Jew? He's the most goyische white bread Jew I've ever
seen.
Mike Piacente
2007-05-23 22:57:32 UTC
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He may not necessarily be Jewish. Alot of people in the New Jersey/New York
area use Yiddish words even if they're not Jewish. Hell, I'm Italian and I
use Yiddish words and I grew up outside of DC.
Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."
Anny
Williams is a Jew? He's the most goyische white bread Jew I've ever
seen.
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-24 02:30:32 UTC
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Post by Mike Piacente
He may not necessarily be Jewish. Alot of people in the New Jersey/New York
area use Yiddish words even if they're not Jewish. Hell, I'm Italian and I
use Yiddish words and I grew up outside of DC.
Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."
Anny
Williams is a Jew? He's the most goyische white bread Jew I've ever
seen.
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-24 02:39:49 UTC
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Post by Mike Piacente
He may not necessarily be Jewish. Alot of people in the New Jersey/New York
area use Yiddish words even if they're not Jewish. Hell, I'm Italian and I
use Yiddish words and I grew up outside of DC.
I've never heard goyim use the word tsoris and goyim don't eat hebrew
national in New York, either. They eat sabrett, nathan's, or oscar
meyer.
Jane
2007-05-24 03:47:14 UTC
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He may not necessarily be Jewish. Alot of people in the New Jersey/New
York area use Yiddish words even if they're not Jewish. Hell, I'm
Italian and I use Yiddish words and I grew up outside of DC.

<I've never heard goyim use the word tsoris and goyim don't eat hebrew
national in New York, either. They eat sabrett, nathan's, or oscar
meyer.>

Just as a matter of curiosity, why don't goyim eat Hebrew National in
NY? I just put them on my list, after reading about them, and seeing the
commercials, because it seemed that they might not have some of the
disgusting junk, and as much fat, as regular hotdogs, but not be as
tasteless as, say, Healthy Choices.
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-24 15:00:15 UTC
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Post by Jane
Just as a matter of curiosity, why don't goyim eat Hebrew National in
NY? I just put them on my list, after reading about them, and seeing the
commercials, because it seemed that they might not have some of the
disgusting junk, and as much fat, as regular hotdogs, but not be as
tasteless as, say, Healthy Choices.
The HN package claims 100% all beef content. As for NYC goyim not
preferring HN hot dogs, it's just a cultural thing. It's like Jews
prefer Fox's U-bet chocolate syrup to others. It's just the way it is.
KK
2007-05-24 21:49:48 UTC
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Post by r***@yahoo.com
I've never heard goyim use the word tsoris and goyim don't eat hebrew
national in New York, either.
Sure, we do.
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-25 10:15:38 UTC
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Post by KK
Post by r***@yahoo.com
I've never heard goyim use the word tsoris and goyim don't eat hebrew
national in New York, either.
Sure, we do.
Right, and I'll bet you'll eat pastrami on white bread, too.
Rev. Vegetable Lasagne
2007-05-25 12:25:24 UTC
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Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by KK
Post by r***@yahoo.com
I've never heard goyim use the word tsoris and goyim don't eat hebrew
national in New York, either.
Sure, we do.
Right, and I'll bet you'll eat pastrami on white bread, too.
only with American cheese and mayo
Rev. Vegetable Lasagne
2007-05-25 00:17:49 UTC
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Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by Mike Piacente
He may not necessarily be Jewish. Alot of people in the New
Jersey/New York area use Yiddish words even if they're not Jewish.
Hell, I'm Italian and I use Yiddish words and I grew up outside of
DC.
I've never heard goyim use the word tsoris and goyim don't eat hebrew
national in New York, either. They eat sabrett, nathan's, or oscar
meyer.
hebrew national is now made by conagra and is full of soy and food starch
like all their products
Shep Hellerman
2007-05-23 22:19:23 UTC
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Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."
Anny
Now see... I just heard a long conversation on a local talk radio
station... with callers confirming.. that the hot dogs were spread
with cream cheese. And as much as cream cheese doesn't seem to fit
with a hot dog, I think I'd rather have that than mayo. So, they say a
Lincoln Log is a split dog, with cream cheese and probably on white
bread.
doc
2007-05-23 22:29:30 UTC
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On 23 May 2007 15:19:23 -0700
Post by Shep Hellerman
Now see... I just heard a long conversation on a local talk radio
station... with callers confirming.. that the hot dogs were spread
with cream cheese. And as much as cream cheese doesn't seem to fit
with a hot dog, I think I'd rather have that than mayo. So, they say a
Lincoln Log is a split dog, with cream cheese and probably on white
bread.
Hell, and I thought such a concoction was simply necessity back in the
day when I was a poor undergraduate. Had I known that I was indulging
in some haute cusine, I perhaps would not have been so testy or bitter.
--
Terry
_______________

All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.

-Aristotle
Ford T. FreezerClown
2007-05-23 23:00:09 UTC
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Post by doc
On 23 May 2007 15:19:23 -0700
Post by Shep Hellerman
Now see... I just heard a long conversation on a local talk radio
station... with callers confirming.. that the hot dogs were spread
with cream cheese. And as much as cream cheese doesn't seem to fit
with a hot dog, I think I'd rather have that than mayo. So, they say a
Lincoln Log is a split dog, with cream cheese and probably on white
bread.
Hell, and I thought such a concoction was simply necessity back in the
day when I was a poor undergraduate. Had I known that I was indulging
in some haute cusine, I perhaps would not have been so testy or bitter.
My favorite dish during my poor undergrad days was - this is a little sick -
a can of tuna over noodles with a spoonfull of either butter or italian
dressing.

It sounds disgusting - but sometimes I actually get an urge for it now and I
still make it from time to time.
Running Scissors
2007-05-23 22:53:42 UTC
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Post by Shep Hellerman
Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."
Anny
Now see... I just heard a long conversation on a local talk radio
station... with callers confirming.. that the hot dogs were spread
with cream cheese. And as much as cream cheese doesn't seem to fit
with a hot dog, I think I'd rather have that than mayo. So, they say a
Lincoln Log is a split dog, with cream cheese and probably on white
bread.
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
Nil
2007-05-23 22:54:20 UTC
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Post by Running Scissors
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
My mom used to make those for us in California. I have a feeling it was
a promotional recipe from a Pillsbury ad. We loved them.
Mike Russell
2007-05-23 22:58:42 UTC
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"Running Scissors" <***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:4654c583$0$4674$***@roadrunner.com...
...
Post by Running Scissors
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
That's Pigs in a Blanket.
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
Ford T. FreezerClown
2007-05-23 23:01:08 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
...
Post by Running Scissors
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
That's Pigs in a Blanket.
--
That's correct. Lincoln Logs are different.
Running Scissors
2007-05-24 14:34:49 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
...
Post by Running Scissors
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
That's Pigs in a Blanket.
Nope.
Mike Russell
2007-05-24 19:09:12 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
...
Post by Running Scissors
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
That's Pigs in a Blanket.
Nope.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigs_in_blankets
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
Running Scissors
2007-05-24 21:23:01 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
Post by Mike Russell
...
Post by Running Scissors
In Long Island we filled them with cheese, then wrapped them in a
Pillsbury croissant.
That's Pigs in a Blanket.
Nope.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigs_in_blankets
But those don;t have the all important cheese inserted in the split dog.
Mike Russell
2007-05-24 22:58:53 UTC
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Post by Running Scissors
Post by Mike Russell
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigs_in_blankets
But those don;t have the all important cheese inserted in the split dog.
Ah, but they do. From der wiki:

"In the United States, the term "pigs in a blanket" refers to hot dogs,
Vienna sausages, or link sausages wrapped in biscuit dough or crescent-roll
dough, and baked. A common variation is to slit the hot dog or sausage and
stuff it with cheese before wrapping in dough. The dough is sometimes
homemade, but canned dough is most common."

I still like the darn things.
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
PattyC
2007-05-26 00:47:26 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
Post by Running Scissors
Post by Mike Russell
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigs_in_blankets
But those don;t have the all important cheese inserted in the split dog.
"In the United States, the term "pigs in a blanket" refers to hot dogs,
Vienna sausages, or link sausages wrapped in biscuit dough or
crescent-roll dough, and baked. A common variation is to slit the hot dog
or sausage and stuff it with cheese before wrapping in dough. The dough is
sometimes homemade, but canned dough is most common."
I still like the darn things.
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to stuffed
cabbage! Talk about not even close...

PattyC
FragileWarrior
2007-05-26 01:41:31 UTC
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Post by PattyC
Post by Mike Russell
Post by Running Scissors
Post by Mike Russell
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigs_in_blankets
But those don;t have the all important cheese inserted in the split dog.
"In the United States, the term "pigs in a blanket" refers to hot
dogs, Vienna sausages, or link sausages wrapped in biscuit dough or
crescent-roll dough, and baked. A common variation is to slit the hot
dog or sausage and stuff it with cheese before wrapping in dough. The
dough is sometimes homemade, but canned dough is most common."
I still like the darn things.
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to
stuffed cabbage! Talk about not even close...
PattyC
I think that's the Polish translation of "Pigs in a blanket". My MIL
called the cabbage wrapped meat thingies she made by that name.
Carol
2007-05-27 15:12:28 UTC
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r***@gmail.com
2012-10-28 12:19:01 UTC
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It was hot dogs split open in the middle with cream cheese in them and on a slice of white bread. The name itself appears to be “made up”.
But they are know as Seattle Cream Cheese Dogs. Supposedly putting cream cheese on a hot dog is done often in Seattle
Mike Russell
2007-05-26 03:31:33 UTC
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From: "PattyC" <***@verizon.net>

[re pigs in a blanket]
Post by PattyC
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to stuffed
cabbage! Talk about not even close...
Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, but was born in California, as was my mom.
---
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
Flagstaff Frank
2007-05-26 03:39:16 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
[re pigs in a blanket]
Post by PattyC
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to stuffed
cabbage! Talk about not even close...
Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, but was born in California, as was my mom.
---
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
How did you like the Burgh? I might relo there next year.
FragileWarrior
2007-05-26 12:01:57 UTC
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Post by Flagstaff Frank
Post by Mike Russell
[re pigs in a blanket]
Post by PattyC
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to
stuffed cabbage! Talk about not even close...
Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, but was born in California, as was my
mom. ---
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
How did you like the Burgh? I might relo there next year.
Do they still have dry counties there? Be forewarned about THAT. It was
slipping back into prohabition.
Ford T. FreezerClown
2007-05-26 12:29:41 UTC
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Post by FragileWarrior
Post by Flagstaff Frank
Post by Mike Russell
[re pigs in a blanket]
Post by PattyC
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to
stuffed cabbage! Talk about not even close...
Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, but was born in California, as was my
mom. ---
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
How did you like the Burgh? I might relo there next year.
Do they still have dry counties there? Be forewarned about THAT. It was
slipping back into prohabition.
PA has a lot of dry townships - I grew up in Eastern PA. I don't know if
there are any whole counties that are dry.

But regardless of whether it's dry or not the liquor laws are seriously
screwed - you can only buy booze in state run stores - and none on Sunday.
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-26 13:34:07 UTC
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On May 26, 8:29 am, "Ford T. FreezerClown"
Post by Ford T. FreezerClown
But regardless of whether it's dry or not the liquor laws are seriously
screwed - you can only buy booze in state run stores - and none on Sunday.
Are you that much of an alcoholic that you have to have alcohol
whenver you choose? What the fuck is worng with you? What is it with
you dickheads and this sick pursuit of instant gratification?
Mike Russell
2007-05-26 19:06:32 UTC
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<***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:***@q69g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
...
OK, guys. Rather than pile on the troll wagon, please just block this guy.

If no one responds to rocky on this thread , I'll answer questions about
State Stores and Beer Distributors, and the time we almost went through
Thanksgiving weekend with 1.25 beers per day per person.
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
j***@yahoo.com
2007-05-26 19:15:09 UTC
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Post by Mike Russell
...
OK, guys. Rather than pile on the troll wagon, please just block this guy.
Give it up, Mike. Haven't you figured it out yet? These lemmings can't
stop responding to my posts. I am testing the Madsion Avenue theory.
Give 'em car crashes (like a dopey NASCAR event, reality TV, WWE,
etc)) and they CAN'T STOP WATCHING.
Mike Russell
2007-05-27 14:56:58 UTC
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[re liquor availability in Pennsylvania, and avoiding a long, dry
Thanksgiving]

While most states simply sell liquor in grocery stores, PA still has some
rather archaic liquor laws that date back to the repeal of prohibition.
There are, AFAIK, no dry counties in the state.

Wine and liquor are sold only in bars and state stores - when I lived there
State Stores were rather plain affairs, rather like Sees Candy stores all in
white, with about two dozen total brands (wine and booze) on display in
lighted alcoves, no advertising, and a counter along the back of the store.
Beer is distributed beer distributors, which are only allowed to be open on
weekday business hours, and are *closed on holidays*. Beer is also
available in bars, but only at bar prices.

One thanksgiving holiday, our family was gathered together for a long
holiday weekend at my folks house in Pittsburgh. It was Wednesday, and
after I explained the above peculiar arrangement to my California-raised
girl friend, she did a quick calculation and figured out that, with five
beer drinkers in the house, and a four day weekend coming up, we had just
over one beer per person per day. After a panicked glance between us, my
brother Tom and I high-tailed it to the beer distributor and bought three
cases of Iron City beer about 30 minutes before closing time. Talk about
under the wire.
--
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
FragileWarrior
2007-05-26 14:56:08 UTC
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Post by Ford T. FreezerClown
Post by FragileWarrior
Post by Flagstaff Frank
Post by Mike Russell
[re pigs in a blanket]
Post by PattyC
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to
stuffed cabbage! Talk about not even close...
Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, but was born in California, as was
my mom. ---
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
How did you like the Burgh? I might relo there next year.
Do they still have dry counties there? Be forewarned about THAT. It
was slipping back into prohabition.
PA has a lot of dry townships - I grew up in Eastern PA. I don't know
if there are any whole counties that are dry.
But regardless of whether it's dry or not the liquor laws are
seriously screwed - you can only buy booze in state run stores - and
none on Sunday.
You can't buy booze here in Indiana on Sunday, either, but you CAN buy
all sorts of booze at most Walmarts, Mon. thru Sat.. Go figure. I moved
here on a Sunday and all I wanted after a two day drive was a shower and
a beer. The house well wasn't working and no one would sell beer. I
almost went back to NYS.
r***@yahoo.com
2007-05-26 15:00:33 UTC
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On May 26, 8:29 am, "Ford T. FreezerClown"
Post by Ford T. FreezerClown
But regardless of whether it's dry or not the liquor laws are seriously
screwed - you can only buy booze in state run stores - and none on Sunday.
Are you that much of an alcoholic that you have to have alcohol
whenver you choose? What the fuck is wrong with you? What is it with
you dickheads and this sick pursuit of instant gratification?
PattyC
2007-06-04 23:31:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Flagstaff Frank
Post by Mike Russell
[re pigs in a blanket]
Post by PattyC
This amazes me, since in Pittsburgh, "pigs in a blanket" refers to
stuffed cabbage! Talk about not even close...
Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, but was born in California, as was my mom.
---
Mike Russell
www.mike.russell-home.net
How did you like the Burgh? I might relo there next year.
I didn't notice this thread before, so forgive me for chiming in now, but..

1. Pittsburgh is great in many ways. Not perfect, not warm all year, not
flat. But friendly as hell and with many interesting nuances. I just
watched a video called, "What makes Pittsburgh Pittsburgh?" and it really
drew a good picture of how things are here. Lots of variety as to
individuals...

2. As to the liquor laws... PA still has "state stores." Which is
entirely dumb, IMHO. HOWever, there are MANY state stores now open on
Sundays, as well as state stores within super markets, so believe me...
things have WAY improved in that regard! There are dry counties, I hear,
but not Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is, and where I live, so I don't
care about that part.

3. The food here is wonderful. Many choices. Many tremendous
restaurants.

4. There is everything you'd get in a bigger city --> major league sports
(not counting the Pirates, of course, but they do have a tremendous
park...), symphony, plays, concerts, etc. But not the traffic or (quite)
the crime of a bigger city.

5. If you move here, move to the North Hills. The location is best re:
access to highways and avoiding traffic problems.

PattyC
Robibnikoff
2007-05-24 14:55:49 UTC
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Post by Shep Hellerman
Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and Timothy
Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
"...Would that my mother were here to defend herself. She went to her reward
years ago, and with her went the Lincoln Log recipe. During what has been a
painful day of culinary reminiscence on my part, all I can recall were Oscar
Mayer "frankfurters" (as my dad still calls them, I believe in deference to
the Supreme Court justice) split suggestively down the middle (I never
watched that part, because as with lobsters, I was never really sure they
were dead) and then slathered-in our version-lengthwise in mayonnaise. I
know. How do you think I feel? That was my life in north Jersey. They made
for a handy, portable heart attack on a bun. Enough aggressively bad food in
a fist-size package to give the eater/victim instant angina (and this was
years before he got voted off American Idol) if not worse. I remember we had
to get a certain kind of bun-the Pepperidge Farm "New England cut"-so that
when splayed open it presented more like a double-thickness slab of Wonder
Bread. On the dog would go copious amounts of mayo-and in some houses, cream
cheese. Always Breakstone's. My mom later developed some tsoris over the
quality of the Oscar Mayers, so we switched to Hebrew Nationals."
Anny
Now see... I just heard a long conversation on a local talk radio
station... with callers confirming.. that the hot dogs were spread
with cream cheese. And as much as cream cheese doesn't seem to fit
with a hot dog, I think I'd rather have that than mayo. So, they say a
Lincoln Log is a split dog, with cream cheese and probably on white
bread.
Ohmigod, how gross! I grew up in Northern NJ (and still live here) and I
have NEVER heard of such a thing :P

Robyn
j***@peepants.net
2007-05-24 01:06:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Anny Middon
The mystery of what is a Lincoln Log sandwich has been solved by Brian
Williams in that Slate.com commentary about The Sopranos. Williams had
remarked that Carm fixing the sandwiches brought back memories, and
Timothy Noah asked what the sandwiches were.
You mean it's not about Vito and the Log Cabin Republicans?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Log_Cabin_Republicans
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